• Prescriptions
  • Telehealth
  • Free Shipping
Create an account and get a online doctor visit
MENU ×
Main Menu ×

All Categories


  •  
  •  

Trinessa

$

Free & Easy Home Delivery

Introductory Offer: $20 off your first order!



 (2-5 business days)
Total $ 0.00

More about Trinessa

TriNessa is a combination birth control pill containing female hormones that prevent ovulation (the release of an egg from an ovary). TriNessa also causes changes in your cervical mucus and uterine lining, making it harder for sperm to reach the uterus and harder for a fertilized egg to attach to the uterus. TriNessa is used as contraception to prevent pregnancy. There are many available brands of this medicine.
It is very important to continue taking this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. With certain brands of birth control pills, the amount of estrogen and progestin in each active tablet will vary at different times in the cycle. Therefore, it is very important that you follow the package instructions to find the first tablet, start with the first tablet in the pack, and take them in the correct order. Do not skip any doses. Pregnancy is more likely if you miss pills, start a new pack late, or take your pill at a different time of the day than usual. Vomiting or diarrhea can prevent your birth control pills from working well. If you have vomiting or diarrhea, you may need to use a back-up birth control method (such as condoms, spermicide). Follow the directions in the Patient Information Leaflet and check with your doctor or pharmacist for more details. Taking this medication after your evening meal or at bedtime may help if you have stomach upset or nausea with the medication. You may choose to take this medication at another time of day that is easier for you to remember. No matter what dosing schedule you use, it is very important that you take this medication at the same time each day, 24 hours apart. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions. Your pill pack contains 21 pills with active medication. It may also contain 7 reminder pills with no medication. Take one active pill (with hormones) once daily for 21 days in a row. If you are using a product with 28 tablets, take an inactive pill once daily for 7 days in a row after you have taken the last active pill unless otherwise directed by your doctor. If you are using a product with 21 tablets, do not take any tablets for 7 days unless otherwise directed by your doctor. You should have your period during the fourth week of the cycle. After you have taken the last inactive tablet in the pack or gone 7 days without taking an active tablet, start a new pack the next day whether or not you have your period. If you do not get your period, consult your doctor. If this is the first time you are using this medication and you are not switching from another form of hormonal birth control (such as patch, other birth control pills), take the first tablet in the pack on the first Sunday following the beginning of your menstrual period or on the first day of your period. If your period begins on a Sunday, begin taking this medication on that day. For the first cycle of use only, use an additional form of non-hormonal birth control (such as condoms, spermicide) for the first 7 days to prevent pregnancy until the medication has enough time to work. If you start on the first day of your period, you do not need to use back-up birth control the first week. Ask your doctor or pharmacist about how to switch from other forms of hormonal birth control (such as patch, other birth control pills) to this product. If any information is unclear, consult the Patient Information Leaflet or your doctor or pharmacist.
An increased risk of the following serious adverse reactions has been associated with the use of oral contraceptives (see WARNINGS). Thrombophlebitis and venous thrombosis with or without embolism Arterial thromboembolism Pulmonary embolism Myocardial infarction Cerebral hemorrhage Cerebral thrombosis Hypertension Gallbladder disease Hepatic adenomas or benign liver tumors There is evidence of an association between the following conditions and the use of oral contraceptives: Mesenteric thrombosis Retinal thrombosis The following adverse reactions have been reported in patients receiving oral contraceptives and are believed to be drug-related: Nausea Vomiting Gastrointestinal symptoms (such as abdominal cramps and bloating) Breakthrough bleeding Spotting Change in menstrual flow Amenorrhea Temporary infertility after discontinuation of treatment Edema Melasma which may persist Breast changes: tenderness, enlargement, secretion Change in weight (increase or decrease) Change in cervical erosion and secretion Diminution in lactation when given immediately postpartum Cholestatic jaundice Migraine Allergic reaction, including rash, urticaria, angioedema Mental depression Reduced tolerance to carbohydrates Vaginal candidiasis Change in corneal curvature (steepening) Intolerance to contact lenses The following adverse reactions have been reported in users of oral contraceptives and a causal association has been neither confirmed nor refuted: Pre-menstrual syndrome Cataracts Changes in appetite Cystitis-like syndrome Headache Nervousness Dizziness Hirsutism Loss of scalp hair Erythema multiforme Erythema nodosum Hemorrhagic eruption Vaginitis Porphyria Impaired renal function Hemolytic uremic syndrome Acne Changes in libido Colitis Budd-Chiari Syndrome The following adverse reactions were also reported in clinical trials or during post-marketing experience: Infections and Infestations: vaginal infection, urinary tract infection; Psychiatric Disorders: mood altered, anxiety, insomnia; Gastrointestinal Disorders: flatulence, pancreatitis, diarrhea, constipation; Reproductive System and Breast Disorders: dysmenorrhea; ovarian cyst, vulvovaginal dryness; Neoplasms Benign, Malignant and Unspecified (Including Cysts and Polyps): benign breast neoplasm, fibroadenoma of breast, breast cyst; Nervous System Disorders: syncope, convulsion, paraesthesia; Eye Disorders: visual impairment, dry eye; Ear and Labyrinth Disorders: vertigo; Cardiac Disorders: tachycardia, palpitations; Vascular Disorders: hot flush; Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders: dyspnoea; Hepatobiliary Disorders: hepatitis; Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders: night sweats, hyperhidrosis, photosensitivity reaction, pruritus; Musculoskeletal, Connective Tissue, and Bone Disorders: muscle spasms, pain in extremity, myalgia, back pain; General Disorders and Administration Site Conditions: chest pain, asthenic conditions.
Store at 25°C (77°F); excursions permitted to 15° - 30°C (59° - 86°F).
Effects of Other Drugs on Combined Hormonal Contraceptives Substances Decreasing The Plasma Concentrations of COCs And Potentially Diminishing The Efficacy Of COCs Drugs or herbal products that induce certain enzymes, including cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), may decrease the plasma concentrations of COCs and potentially diminish the effectiveness of CHCs or increase breakthrough bleeding. Some drugs or herbal products that may decrease the effectiveness of hormonal contraceptives include phenytoin, barbiturates, carbamazepine, bosentan, felbamate, griseofulvin, oxcarbazepine, rifampicin, topiramate, rifabutin, rufinamide, aprepitant, and products containing St. Johns wort. Interactions between hormonal contraceptives and other drugs may lead to breakthrough bleeding and/or contraceptive failure. Counsel women to use an alternative method of contraception or a back-up method when enzyme inducers are used with CHCs, and to continue back-up contraception for 28 days after discontinuing the enzyme inducer to ensure contraceptive reliability. Substances Increasing The Plasma Concentrations of COCs Co-administration of atorvastatin or rosuvastatin and certain COCs containing EE increase AUC values for EE by approximately 20-25%. Ascorbic acid and acetaminophen may increase plasma EE concentrations, possibly by inhibition of conjugation. CYP3A4 inhibitors such as itraconazole, voriconazole, fluconazole, grapefruit juice, or ketoconazole may increase plasma hormone concentrations. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/ Hepatitis C virus (HCV) Protease Inhibitors And Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors Significant changes (increase or decrease) in the plasma concentrations of estrogen and/or progestin have been noted in some cases of co-administration with HIV protease inhibitors (decrease [e.g., nelfinavir, ritonavir, darunavir/ritonavir, (fos)amprenavir/ritonavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, and tipranavir/ritonavir] or increase [e.g., indinavir and atazanavir/ritonavir]) /HCV protease inhibitors (decrease [e.g., boceprevir and telaprevir]) or with non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (decrease [e.g., nevirapine] or increase [e.g., etravirine]). Colesevelam Colesevelam, a bile acid sequestrant, given together with a combination oral hormonal contraceptive, has been shown to significantly decrease the AUC of EE. A drug interaction between the contraceptive and colesevelam was decreased when the two drug products were given 4 hours apart. Effects of Combined Hormonal Contraceptives on Other Drugs COCs containing EE may inhibit the metabolism of other compounds (e.g., cyclosporine, prednisolone, theophylline, tizanidine, and voriconazole) and increase their plasma concentrations. COCs have been shown to decrease plasma concentrations of acetaminophen, clofibric acid, morphine, salicylic acid, temazepam and lamotrigine. Significant decrease in plasma concentration of lamotrigine has been shown, likely due to induction of lamotrigine glucuronidation. This may reduce seizure control; therefore, dosage adjustments of lamotrigine may be necessary. Women on thyroid hormone replacement therapy may need increased doses of thyroid hormone because serum concentrations of thyroid-binding globulin increases with use of COCs. Interactions With Laboratory Tests Certain endocrine and liver function tests and blood components may be affected by oral contraceptives: Increased prothrombin and factors VII, VIII, IX, and X; decreased antithrombin 3; increased norepinephrine-induced platelet aggregability. Increased thyroid binding globulin (TBG) leading to increased circulating total thyroid hormone, as measured by protein-bound iodine (PBI), T4 by column or by radioimmunoassay. Free T3 resin uptake is decreased, reflecting the elevated TBG, free T4 concentration is unaltered. Other binding proteins may be elevated in serum. Sex hormone binding globulins are increased and result in elevated levels of total circulating sex steroids; however, free or biologically active levels either decrease or remain unchanged. Triglycerides may be increased and levels of various other lipids and lipoproteins may be affected. Glucose tolerance may be decreased. Serum folate levels may be depressed by oral contraceptive therapy. This may be of clinical significance if a woman becomes pregnant shortly after discontinuing oral contraceptives.
Serious ill effects have not been reported following acute ingestion of large doses of oral contraceptives by young children. Overdosage may cause nausea and withdrawal bleeding may occur in females. Non-Contraceptive Health Benefits The following non-contraceptive health benefits related to the use of combination oral contraceptives are supported by epidemiological studies which largely utilized oral contraceptive formulations containing estrogen doses exceeding 0.035 mg of ethinyl estradiol or 0.05 mg mestranol. Effects on menses: increased menstrual cycle regularity decreased blood loss and decreased incidence of iron deficiency anemia decreased incidence of dysmenorrhea Effects related to inhibition of ovulation: decreased incidence of functional ovarian cysts decreased incidence of ectopic pregnancies Other effects: decreased incidence of fibroadenomas and fibrocystic disease of the breast decreased incidence of acute pelvic inflammatory disease decreased incidence of endometrial cancer decreased incidence of ovarian cancer
Free & Easy Home Delivery

Introductory Offer: $20 off your first order!



 (2-5 business days)
Total $ 0.00

Frequently Asked Questions

We've compiled a list of commonly asked questions for your convenience. If you are unable to find the answer to your question, please contact us for further assistance. It's just one more way UPRx prioritizes your self-care.


If you are one of half of the US population who benefits from taking prescription drugs, then UPRx is for you. We offer cash medication so you can…

• Bypass high insurance copays.
• Order with complete discretion.
• Purchase without insurance policy limitations and restrictions.
• Have access to lower priced medications
• Order your medication without insurance
• Avoid the hassle of going to the pharmacy to fill your prescriptions.

If any of the above sound as awesome to you as they do to us, we can safely say that UPRx is the alternative for you.
In order to fulfill your order we will need a corresponding prescription. However, if you don’t already have one we can help you with that! We have partnered with a third-party Telehealth company, providing online consultations with US licensed doctors, for a $5 fee.
We make it easy! All we require is contact information for your pharmacy or doctor’s office, and we will take care of transferring your prescription over for you. If you do not have an existing prescription, you can talk to one of our online physicians now and they can submit a prescription directly into our system for you.
UPRx.com offers both generic and brand-name prescription medications. The generic versions are generally significantly cheaper than the brand name version of a drug. However, please consult with your doctor to find out which variation of any specific drug is best for you.
With the exception of our products’ pricing and our third- party Telehealth service, the use of our website and services are completely cost-free.
After your order is placed, UPRx will retrieve your valid prescription from your doctor or pharmacy. Once the prescription is confirmed as authorized and corresponding to your order, our participating pharmacy begins to process your order. Depending on the specific drug and location, we can ship out some products as soon as same day, and we commit to shipping out all products within 48 hours of verifying your prescription.
Our site does not support insurance at this time, as we are focusing our efforts on getting you the best cash price. You may not know this, but there are some instances where it’s significantly cheaper to pay cash for a medication rather than to order it through your insurer’s pharmacy benefits program. Here at UPRx, we cut out the middleman and do the negotiating for you- providing you with the same drugs, for less pay.
Nothing should stand in the way of you getting the drugs you need to feel and perform your best. UPRx orders arrive in discreet packaging, because your health is personal, and should remain that way.
UPRx operates under strict HIPAA compliance laws and regulations to ensure that your privacy is paramount.
When UPRx obtains your medical information while acting on your behalf, we will maintain the privacy and security of that information in accordance with the standards of the HIPAA security regulations. Additionally, UPRx is fully registered and operates in multiple locations across the United States of America. Our partner pharmacy, Apogee BioPharm, is licensed and operated in all 50 states and territories. At UPRx we are committed to only purchasing locally sourced items and products.

Talk to a Pharmacist Now

Get answers to all your drug related questions.